Customer requirements have sharpened our accuracy

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Customer requirements have sharpened our accuracy

Hjerno’s tools have become even more accurate.

A long-term goal oriented focus on increasing the accuracy of our machining work combined with a number of projects with unprecedented quality requirements has helped raise the bar for how accurate our tools really can become.

In particular, a number of fuel cell projects for two international clients with machining tolerances down to 3 micron and another project that resulted in an all-new tool concept have raised the technical knowledge to a new level, says Aage Agergaard, General Manager.

"All machining work has gotten a boost thanks to the extreme demands we have met from our customers with these projects. This means that it is now the rule rather than the exception that a tool is spot on when we test it for the first time.”

Extreme standards of accuracy for the whole tool
The very low tolerances of, for example, the fuel cell project have been achieved using both state-of-the-art CNC machines with an extreme accuracy, continuous optimization of the Hjerno CAM system and a much more scientific approach to advanced milling strategies.

"This means, among other things, that even the non-cutting tool parts are becoming much more accurate than they have been before. So the extreme standards of accuracy that previously applied to the actual form tool now also apply to the whole of the tool, which helps extend its life significantly, "says Aage Agergaard.

He assures that the tools will not be more expensive for that reason, as the extreme accuracy of all tool parts means that both the assembly and the fine adjustment of the ready-to-use tool will be much easier.

"Tools must constantly become more and more efficient. So when it’s possible, of course we should do it, "says Aage Agergaard.